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Monthly Archives: February 2018

About Ceramic and Metallic Brake Pads

Metallic Brake – Advantages

  • These brakes can handle higher temperatures which mean that you will have longer lasting brake pads.
  • They can be used in any type of weather condition because of how stubbornly the compounds react to temperature. They are also suitable for every day driving as well as track and race driving.
  • They don’t wear easily because of its strong construction.
  • Metallic brake pads are significantly cheaper than the ceramic counterpart.

Metallic Brake – Disadvantages

  • Metallic brake pads are known to be a bit noisier than ceramic brake pads. This isn’t a major problem but it can be slightly annoying if the brake pads are made of metal.
  • They release more dust which can be lodged in the crevices of your vehicle. It’s also an unpleasant part to clean.
  • The brake pad itself might not wear easily but it can damage the rotors over time. This could be a costly factor.

Ceramic Brake – Advantages

  • Compared to metallic options, ceramic produces less noise making the drive quite pleasant for the person behind the wheel.
  • Ceramic doesn’t produce as much dust because it is a stronger component compared to that of metal. The dust is so fine that it just slides through the treads and gaps of the wheel.
  • Because ceramic material is technically rock, it has a longer life span than metal. It also handles higher temperatures better than any other types, which means high speed is fine for them!

Ceramic Brake – Disadvantages

  • Ceramic brakes are by far the most expensive material to get this component in.
  • Although it can handle high temperatures, it is not compatible with cold climates. The chances of it becoming brittle are quite high.
  • They have a limited use because they can only be used of day-to-day vehicles. It’s not suitable for heavy duty vehicles and race cars.

About Oxygen Sensor Solutions

As a backgrounder, your oxygen sensor works like this: placed inside of your exhaust pipe, the oxygen sensor detects the ratio of air and gasoline your engine is fed. If the mixture is too rich or too lean than the oxygen sensor adjusts the amount of fuel entering your engine accordingly. The wrong mix of gasoline and oxygen can increase pollutants that exit your vehicle – thereby harming the environment — as well as potentially causing your catalytic converter to fail or even damage your engine. So, a properly working oxygen sensor is a must for any vehicle.

There are some clear signs that your oxygen sensor is no longer functioning. They can include:

–A rotten egg odor emitting from the exhaust.

–A reduction in fuel economy.

–Your catalytic converter fails unexpectedly.

–Exhaust emissions reach undesirable levels.

–Your engine surges or hesitates.

You can diagnose the problem yourself if you have access to the right tools including a digital voltmeter, an oxygen sensor socket, and a propane enrichment device. These specific tools, along with a proper Haynes or Chilton manual by your side, should be all that you need to determine if the oxygen sensor is no longer working. If it has failed, than consider ordering your replacement part online through a reliable wholesaler such as the Oxygen Sense shop to obtain a high quality OEM part at discounted prices. Once your part has arrived than all you will need is one or two automotive wrenches to accomplish the job. Again, reference your car’s manual for exact instructions.

With the abundance of sensors and technical gadgetry on today’s vehicles it can seem fairly intimidating to do the work yourself. Fortunately, an oxygen sensor is one of the easier parts to replace, so if you do the work yourself you will save time and money as well as gain an important sense of achievement. Go ahead you weekend mechanic, you can do it!

Clean Car Battery

First, you will need to gather supplies for this project. Most of these items you may already have in your home.

Safety glasses or goggles

Box of baking soda

Adjustable pliers with insulated handles

Screwdrivers with insulated handles

A small, stiff-bristled brush (an old toothbrush will work just fine!)

Assorted small open-end and box wrenches

Small metal or plastic scraper

Special battery tools, including a cable puller and cable

terminal cleaning brushes

A turkey baster or small funnel

All-purpose household cleaner in a spray bottle

Sponges or clean cloths

A source of ample clean water such as a garden hose or a large

bucket and sponge

Rubber gloves for protecting your hands

There are a few safety tips to keep in mind when getting ready to clean the battery. First of all, you safety glasses and gloves must be worn to protect your eyes and skin from sulfuric acid that can linger in the corrosion deposits. Also, this material can eat away at your car’s paint, so keep it away from that as well.

Because the amount of dirt and corrosion on batteries may differ from one another, battery cleaning will vary, so some of the steps below may or may not need to be performed. Sometimes, to thoroughly remove severe corrosion and dirt, you may even need to remove the battery from the vehicle.

First, scrape off any white or greenish corrosion deposits with the stiff-bristled brush or small metal or plastic scraper. Next, use the solution of baking soda mixed with water, approximately one heaping tablespoon to each pint of water. Carefully apply it to the outside of the battery and its cable connections with the turkey baster or small funnel. Then, you can use your brush to work the baking soda solution into the heavily corroded areas. If you find that the cable clamps or terminals are badly corroded at the battery, you can disconnect them for easier cleaning. For this, you may need to use pliers, assorted wrenches and a small battery cable puller to disconnect them. You should disconnect the negative first, followed by the positive.

Then, use your battery cable scrapers or brush to remove the corrosion from the terminals, battery posts and hold down clamps and brackets. Flush these parts with your baking soda solution to rid them of any trace of corrosion. After this, wash the outside of the battery, the cable ends and the hold down parts with a liquid cleaner in a spray bottle. After that, use a sponge or rag to get off any remaining dirt or grease. After everything is clean, dry off the battery and all its parts with a dry rag or cloth.

The final step is just reinstalling any part that was removed and tightening everything so it is secure. Reconnect the battery, positive cable first. You’re done! You’re battery is now safe and clean.

Info of Windshield Repair Process

Chip Repair

A chip, or more commonly called ding, is a small break caused by object impact from stones and projectiles. The break can be structurally classified as bullseye, star break, and combination. Most other structural breaks are derivations of these three basic types.

In order to properly fix chips, several steps must be followed to ensure the best repair. Beginning with preparation, the technician cleans the surface of the damaged area of loose glass shards. Then the center of the impact point is opened up through drilling to facilitate resin injection. Depending on the type of break, the chip may be further “tapped” to create a reservoir in the glass through which resin can flow easier into harder-to-reach spots.

Now that the chip surface has been prepared, the technician aligns the injector head to the chip entry point, first vacuuming the air out of the break and then following through with resin injection. When the chip has filled, under a curing light, the resin in the chip begins to solidify, bonding the cracked windshield together. The remaining steps involve curing additional layers of resin onto the chip impact point to ensure a smooth surface and polishing to protect the resin from chemicals in the air and wiper washers.

Prelude to Crack Repair

Crack repair deserves a little more attention. Before you consider a crack repair, please ask yourself the following questions:

What type of crack is it?
How long has it been there?
Where is the crack?
What are you trying to achieve with a crack repair?

If the crack is a single long crack (one impact point, one crack) and under 24 inches, a crack repair is feasible over a windshield replacement. If there are multiple single long cracks in different locations, then you also need ask yourself what you want from the repair. If the crack has many legs (one impact point, multiple cracks) then you should eliminate repair from your considerations and go directly to replacement. There has been too much structural distortion to properly repair that. Lastly, if the crack is a stress crack, meaning that it developed without an external break, then either your windshield is defective or your car frame has somehow warped that an abnormal stress pattern is exerted on the windshield.

Next, after a rigorous process of elimination and you determined that your crack belongs to those fixable single long cracks, you should also know how long the crack has been there. Cracks one month old are repairable. Over that you should consult a repair technician. Factors such as the number of car washes, types of car washes, driving environment and overnight parking locations will affect the cleanliness of your crack.

The answer to the next question is basically a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to repair.

Q: “Where is the crack?” (Should I repair the windshield?)
A: “Over the driver’s primary viewing area.” (No.)
A: “Somewhere else.” (Yes.)

Lastly if you want to have a perfectly transparent windshield, you should opt for replacement. Repair will improve it cosmetically but sometimes and at some angles you will be able to see a thin line and a little bit of visual distortion, but not enough to affect your driving ability. I recommend you to get a replacement if you have multiple single long cracks, unless you care less about seeing visual blemishes than paying top dollars for a good replacement.

Crack Repair

Now that we have got through the administrative material, let’s get to the point.

Crack repair begins with creating a tip for the crack. The tip serves as an end point for the crack; in other words, you can imagine the tip as a heavy weight anchor that the crack is tied to. Filling the tip in separately, the technician then proceeds to inject resin into the crack starting from its impact point. Then slowly and methodically the technician moves the injector along the crack path and filling those spaces gradually until reaching the vicinity of the tip. After resin has finished filling, the technician cures the resin.

Resin

One very important element of repair is the resin. Resin viscosity rating correlates to its strength. For chip repairs, the resin viscosity is lower than the resin viscosity used in crack repairs. The reason being that resin used for chip repairs need to be versatile to go into nooks-and-crannies and less for strength, since the structural damage is very small. For cracks, there are no small spaces to wedge into and it is very important to have stronger resin to fully bond the crack together.